How our work is making a difference

SEE OUR WORK

The Crane Center for Early Childhood Research and Policy is a multidisciplinary research center dedicated to conducting high-quality research that improves children’s learning and development at home, in school and in the community.

Our Work

Our work ranges from multi-year, federally funded projects that examine outcomes of thousands of children and families, to program evaluation work in our state, to smaller scale analyses and briefs meant to inform policy makers and practitioners.

Meet Our Staff

Recent News

Policy Round-Up: Climate crisis is a children's issue
This week’s update includes why the climate crisis is a children’s issue, a national survey of child care providers found that one third of Ohio respondents said their program likely would have closed without federal and state coronavirus relief funds, and a policy brief examining the health and economics costs of ACEs (adverse childhood experiences) in ...
Policy Round-Up: Could the creation of “early childhood districts” improve access?
This week’s update includes an article making the case for “early childhood districts” akin to K-12 school districts, a map showing how states are planning to spend their federal COVID relief funds on education, and why researchers are calling for a “more nuanced understanding” as to when and how reading digitally vs. in print may ...
Policy Round-Up: U.S. voters overwhelmingly support paid leave
This week’s update includes surveys and research studies which indicate that U.S. voters overwhelmingly support paid leave, Crane senior research associate Dr. Rebecca Dore was quoted in a USA TODAY article focusing on limiting children’s screen time, and what school leaders are doing to meet the mental health needs of students.
Crane and Schoenbaum teams receive $14.3 million in federal funds to support work
This year our received more than $14.3 million in new funding to help us deepen our understanding of how children learn and how to best support them during the most formative years of brain development.